Friday, December 21, 2001

Media Policies - Adult Institutions

California correctional facilities and programs are operated at public expense for the protection of society. The public has a right and a duty to know how such facilities and programs are being operated. It is the policy of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to make known to the public through the news media all relevant information pertaining to operations of the department and facilities.

Following is a summary of California regulations and department policies and procedures regarding media access and activities. The complete regulations are found in the California Code of Regulations Title 15, Sections 3260 through 3267, found at this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Regulations/Adult_Operations/docs/Title152006Final.pdf

Authorized Release of Information

The following data that may be released about an inmate or parolee includes:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Birthplace
  • Place of previous residence
  • Commitment information
  • Facility assignments and behavior
  • General state of health
  • Cause of death
  • Nature of injury or critical illness (unless the condition is related to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)
  • Sentencing and release actions.
CDCR employee data that may be released includes:

  • Name
  • Civil service classification
  • Age
  • Work assignment
  • Length of service with the department and/or current division or unit
  • Past work assignments
  • Role or function in a newsworthy event
Media Access to Facilities

Access to adult CDCR facilities or contract facilities - prisons, community correctional facilities, re-entry facilities, prisoner mother facilities, and camps - and other CDCR offices including parole offices, requires prior approval of the institution head and the press secretary of the CDCR Office of Public and Employee Communications.

Within a facility, media representatives shall be under the direct supervision of the public information officer or his/her designee.

Media representatives cannot enter security housing units (SHU), condemned units (death row), the execution chamber, Administrative Segregation Units (AdSeg or ASU) or any area currently affected by an emergency without approval of the CDCR Secretary, the Director of the Division of Adult Institutions, or designee.

There may be limited access to other areas. These may include control booths, guard towers, protective housing units, reception centers, and units housing mentally, seriously or terminally ill inmates.

Media representatives need to supply a full name, date of birth, social security number and driver's license number to process a security clearance for access to an institution. Media representatives from outside the United States need to supply a full name, date of birth and passport information. If it is a breaking story, media representatives may be allowed access to an area outside the secure perimeter of the facility.

Requests to attend life prisoner parole hearings are handled by the Board of Parole Hearings at (916) 323-2993.

Writing, Telephoning and Visiting an Inmate

Media representatives may contact any state prison inmate by mail. It is not necessary for media to notify CDCR before communicating with an inmate. Incoming letters are opened, inspected for contraband, subject to be read, and then forwarded to the inmate. To ensure prompt processing, mail the letter to the inmate using his/her full name and CDC number in care of the institution where he/she is incarcerated. To get an inmate's CDC number, call the Inmate Check Line at (916) 557-5933. You must have the correct date of birth to obtain the CDC number.

Most inmates have access to telephones and can make outgoing collect calls on designated telephones according to their privilege group. Limitations are placed on the frequency of such calls to allow equal access to telephones by all inmates. When corresponding with an inmate, media representatives may provide a telephone number where an inmate can call them collect. It is up to the inmate to initiate the call. No restriction is placed on the identity or relationship to the inmate of the person called providing the person agrees to accept all charges for the call. Telephone calls are limited to 15 minutes and may be recorded. Media representatives may also record the call with the inmate's permission. Messages will not be taken by staff to inmates.

All inmates are allowed visits with approved visitors. If a media representative wishes to visit an inmate, write to the inmate and ask him/her to send you a CDC Form 106, Visiting Questionnaire. Your completed questionnaire must be submitted and approved by the institution before your visit. The application process takes about 30 working days. All approved visitors - friend, relative, attorney, or member of the media - may visit; however, they may not bring in cameras or recording devices. The institution will provide, upon request, pencil and paper to an adult visitor as needed. For more information about visiting, call the toll-free CDCR Visiting Information number at 1-800-374-8474 or go to this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Visitors/index.html

Media Interviews

Media representatives can interview inmates or parolees randomly and random or specific-person face-to-face interviews with staff. Such interviews may be restricted by time, place, duration, and the number of people in a media crew.

Random interviews of inmates involved in a specific activity or program, or encountered while covering a facility activity or event, shall be limited to the time, areas and segments of the facility population designated by the institution head.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. No inmate, parolee or staff shall be interviewed against their will.

Use of cameras or recording devices inside an institution or on state property requires prior approval.

A CDC Form 146, Inmate Declaration To News Media Contact, shall be completed whenever an inmate is the subject of a still, motion picture or other recording intended for use by a television or radio station, or newspaper, magazine or other publication.

Media interviews shall not be permitted with an inmate suffering from a mental illness when, in the opinion of a psychiatrist or psychologist, the inmate is not capable of giving informed consent.

Controlled access may be permitted to seriously or terminally ill patients and their housing areas.

Media representatives or their organization may be required to pay the security or escort costs provided for interviews.

Cameras and Other Audio or Visual Recording Devices

Possession of any camera, wireless microphone or other recording device within a CDCR facility is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the institution head. A location agreement and a film permit from the California Film Commission may be required for filming on state property.

An inmate's consent is not required in settings like an exercise yard or dining hall where individuals are not singled out or where an inmate's identity is not revealed. Before such shots are taken however, inmates shall be advised so those who do not want to be recognized may turn away or leave the area.

Unless there is a specified threat of imminent danger to an inmate or parolee by releasing their photograph, media representatives shall be permitted access to identification photographs (mug shots) without the inmate's or parolee's consent.

Staff cannot prohibit a person who is not on state property from photographing, filming, video taping or otherwise recording any department facilities, employees, inmates, parolees or equipment.

Non-News Access to CDC Facilities

All non-news motion picture, radio, or television programs produced at any CDCR facility must have prior approval. For definition purposes, non-news related productions include features, documentaries, news magazine programs, commercials, and pilots for proposed news, public information, religious and entertainment television programs.

The process for approval consideration begins with a written request to the CDCR Press Office. The request should include:

  • Details of the project and production location needs
  • Production schedule and duration
  • Crew size
  • Any access to inmates
  • Script sections that pertain to CDCR
  • Scenes to be filmed inside a CDCR facility
  • Type/quantity of production equipment on premises
  • Any satellite or microwave transmission from a CDCR facility

If project approval is given, a location agreement must be executed with the parent firm and a California Film Commission permit (http://www.film.ca.gov/state/film/film_homepage.jsp) will be required along with evidence of financial responsibility and liability insurance in the amount of at least $1 million with the State of California, its offices, employees, and agents as the "additional insureds." Part of the agreement provides for defending and indemnifying the State against any lawsuits. Another part of the agreement also states that the parent firm is responsible for reasonable staffing costs, including benefits and overtime rates of pay, directly associated with its filming activities.

Editorial researchers, freelance writers, authors of books, independent filmmakers, and other unaccredited media must provide proof of employment by an accredited publication/production company, or have evidence that an accredited publication/production company has contracted to purchase the completed project.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. Random face-to-face interviews may be permitted with inmates as stipulated by the location agreement.

Please allow a minimum of 20 working days for the least complicated request. There are no assurances that access will be granted; however, CDCR does try to accommodate requests within available resources consistent with the safe and secure operations of its institutions and California law.

CDCR Press Office (916) 445-4950

The Press Office, located at CDCR headquarters in Sacramento, articulates the Department's position on issues, manages crisis communications, solicits media coverage of departmental activities, serves as a liaison to the media, and releases information to the public. The Press Office responds to media requests made under the California Public Records Act.

The Press Office also provides other services to media:

Inmate Check Line

Media representatives needing information about a convicted felon sent to state prison in California can call the Press Office's Inmate Check Line. To request whether an individual has been sent to state prison, call (916) 557-5933. Please provide the full name and either the date of birth or the CDC number. Sentencing and/or release information will be faxed within 24 hours.

Stock Video Footage and Still Photographs

The Office of Public and Employee Communications maintains a library of stock video footage and still photographs and makes these available to the media upon request. There is current and archived footage and photographs of correctional facilities and programs, including restricted or limited access areas such as control booths, guard towers, the execution chamber, death row, and Administrative Segregation and Security Housing Units.

Media Inquiries

The Press Office researches and responds to inquiries from the media. Facts are gathered as quickly as possible and provided to the inquirer. If the requested facts are not known or are otherwise unavailable, the inquirer shall be informed and the reasons therefore.

Frequently asked questions about CDCR can be found on the CDCR Website

Press advisories and releases are posted on the CDCR website at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/2007_Press_Releases/index.html

Statistics and information about capital punishment are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/capital.html

The weekly population reports for adult prisoners and adult parolees are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/Offender_Information_Services_Branch/Population_Reports.asp

There are other reports about adult inmates and parolees, including characteristics, recidivism rates, behavior, time served and historical trends. There are also reports about DNA sampling and inmates serving three-strikes sentences. These reports can be found on the Offender Information Reports page.

Media Access to Scheduled Executions

CDCR's Press Office processes all media requests for access to San Quentin State Prison to cover scheduled executions. The Press Office also coordinates media requests to witness executions.

Escapes

In the event of an actual or suspected escape, the public information officer or designee shall notify radio and television stations and newspapers in the surrounding communities and the missing inmate's home community. The prison will provide the missing inmate's physical description, estimated time of disappearance, an identification photograph, the facility's search efforts and cooperation with law enforcement agencies.

Thursday, October 11, 2001

STAFF, INMATES AND WARDS HELP WITH DISASTER RELIEF STATEWIDE

(Sacramento) Ever since the attacks in New York and Washington, D.C. on Sept. 11, there has been an outpouring of generosity by Americans to the relief efforts. The staff, inmates and wards of the California Department of Corrections and the California Youth Authority are no exception.

"Inmates in California’s prisons have pledged well over $50,000," said Edward S. Alameida, Jr., Director of the California Department of Corrections. "And that amount will probably go higher. Fundraising is still under way at several of our institutions, and we don’t have final totals yet."
Donations have ranged from the $15,000 raised by a candy and portrait sale by inmates at the Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla to $4.69 from an inmate at Wasco State Prison.

"The Warden asked why that amount," said John Katavich, a spokesman for Wasco. "We looked at his account, and that’s all he had."

Money isn’t the only thing that inmates are donating. At the California Institution for Women in Frontera, inmates made 41 quilts that will be donated to families in New York and Washington. Inmates in the upholstery shop at Chuckawalla Valley State Prison in Blythe used scrap material to make booties for the search and rescue dogs in New York.

Wards and staff at the California Youth Authority have done their part, too.
"The Youth Authority family of employees, as well as the youthful offenders we supervise, have raised; more than $35,000—and the donations, fundraising sales and volunteer hours continue to grow," said Jerry L. Harper, Director of the California Youth Authority (CYA). "It is gratifying to see the sense of community spirit exhibited by employees and youthful offenders alike in the face of this tragic event."

Within the CYA, a majority of the $35,000 raised has been initiated by youthful offenders (wards and parolees) through restorative justice activities who have donated money from their trust funds, performed various fundraisers, such as car washes, as well as selling coffee mugs with flags on them, and charging for events such as movies and special meals within the institutions. CYA staff, as well as staff from the California Department of Forestry, have made generous donations to these specific fundraising efforts, and as well as to a trust fund at the Golden One Credit Union that has raised more than $337,000 statewide from all state employees.

Staff at the California Department of Corrections and the California Youth Authority are aggressively raising money for relief efforts in other ways as well. In addition to individual donations, staff at the California Correctional Center and High Desert State Prison in Susanville participated with local law enforcement in a spaghetti feed that raised more than $10,000. Many institutions have participated in or are planning other fundraising events.

A hastily organized, two-day bake sale and fundraiser by workers in the California Department of Corrections headquarters in Sacramento netted $3,700.

So far, CDC staff have raised well over $50,000. That does not include some donations from employees have made through their individual credit unions or directly to relief organizations.

Thursday, September 20, 2001

EDWARD S. ALAMEIDA, JR. APPOINTED DIRECTOR OF THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

(Sacramento) – Gov. Gray Davis appointed Edward S. Alameida, Jr. Director of the California Department of Corrections (CDC) effective Sept. 19, 2001.
"I am both humbled and honored to be appointed by Gov. Davis as the new director of the largest state agency," Alameida said. "This is a great department with many high caliber professionals and I’ve had the opportunity to work with many of these dedicated people. It is a tremendous challenge and privilege to serve the people of California in this position."

Alameida was serving as Assistant Deputy Director for CDC’s Institutions Division since March 13, 2000. In this position, he was responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Division and managed the Institutions Operations Unit, institutions programs, and the Education and Inmate Programs Unit.

Alameida began his career with CDC in 1973, working in the accounting office at Folsom State Prison. Throughout the past 28 years, he has held a broad range of positions at CDC headquarters in Sacramento, California Medical Facility in Vacaville, Folsom State Prison, and Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy. He served as an associate budget analyst, departmental budget officer, correctional administrator, associate warden of business services, chief deputy warden, chief administrator and operations officer, and warden.

"It has been said that preparation precedes usefulness. I feel that Ed’s 28 years of experience with CDC has prepared him to take on this responsibility," Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Robert Presley said. "Throughout the years, Ed has demonstrated his expertise in correctional administration and management. I am confident that his experience in budget and fiscal issues, his rapport with staff and his management style will serve the Department well."

Alameida, 52, received a bachelor of science degree in business administration from California State University, Sacramento.

Alameida and his wife Mary Beth have three children, two sons and a daughter. They are involved in numerous community activities.

CDC is one of the largest correctional agencies in the free world and the largest state agency in California, employing 47,382 people and supervising nearly 159,000 inmates and more than 121,000 people on parole. CDC operates 33 state prisons, 41 conservation camps, 16 community correctional facilities, eight prisoner mother facilities, 32 re-entry centers, 182 parole units in 81 locations and four parole outpatient clinics with a $4.8 billion budget.

Tuesday, June 5, 2001

EPA, CDC LAUD NATION’S FIRST WET CLEANING PRISON

New alternative to dry cleaning produces less pollution

SAN FRANCISCO – Officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Corrections visited Soledad State Prison today to announce the first program in the country where inmates will use wet cleaning – an environmentally responsible alternative to dry cleaning – as part of its vocational training program.

The program, made possible by a $10,000 federal grant from the Vocational and Technical Education Act and an additional $12,000 in CDC vocational funds, allows inmates at Soledad to process 23 tons of laundry per year while learning a new trade. Prisoners clean officers’ uniforms, prison employees’ clothing, and laundry for local non-profit organizations, such as school band uniforms and graduation gowns.

In addition, the EPA provided $40,000 to the Environmental Finance Center in Hayward to promote the vocational wet cleaning project.

"This innovative project not only benefits our air and water, but it trains a future work force in a burgeoning environmental field," said Jack Broadbent, the EPA’s air division director in San Francisco. "This is a great example of government working together to benefit the common good."

"This project supports the goals of the Vocational and Technical Education Act in that it further advances technology in the classroom," CDC Acting Director Steven Cambra, Jr. said.

"Our vocational instuctors are always looking for ways to improve our equipment and to initiate new innovative technology,"said CTF Warden Jim Hamlet

"Dry cleaners are not opposed to wet cleaning, but they're reluctant to make the investment. According to our research, for professional wetcleaning to prosper, we need to increase consumer awareness of and demand for this alternative and then provide a better trained workforce." said Susan Blachman, Associate Director of the Environmental Finance Center, Region IX. "This program offers that training."

Soledad vocational training officials contacted the Environmental Finance Center after attending an EPA-sponsored wet cleaning seminar in 1997. Since instituting the program in November, the prison has cut its operating costs by 80 percent and reduced its use by 50 percent of perchlorethylene – a possible human carcinogen.

What is Wet Cleaning?

Wet cleaning is a pollution prevention method for cleaning clothes that is technically and financially comparable to conventional dry cleaning. More than 80 percent of dry cleaners nationwide use perchloroethylene, a hazardous air pollutant, in their cleaning processes. Perchloroethylene-based dry cleaning is responsible for approximately 20,000 tons of harmful air emission annually in California alone, and has also contaminated 158 groundwater wells in Southern California in the 12 years ending in 1996.

The wet cleaning process uses water and biodegradable soaps that can be released just as the wastewater from a conventional home washing machine is discharged. A wet cleaning process generates no hazardous solid waste and prevents pollution in water, air and land.

Background on Soledad Vocational Training Program

The CDC’s Education Inmate Program Unit operates one of the largest accredited adult correctional education system in the world, providing academic development, vocational training, library services and recreation programs throughout the state’s 33 prisons. The adult schools within the prisons are accredited and 1,300 credentialed teachers provide training and instruction to more than 30,000 inmates per month.

The CDC offers inmates training in 12 different vocational areas, the largest of which is dry cleaning. Twenty of the 33 state prisons offer vocational dry cleaning programs. In fiscal year 2000-2001, 4 percent of all inmates participated in the vocational dry cleaning programs. (Prisons are not allowed to compete with businesses and so do not offer their services to local residents.)

Contact: Leo Kay, EPA, 415/744-2201
Terry Thornton, CDC, 916/445-4950
Javier Aboytes, CTF at Soledad, 831/678-5952

Monday, June 4, 2001

EPA, CDC TO LAUD ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECT AT SOLEDAD PRISON

Landmark program to protect air, water while training new job force
SAN FRANCISCO – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Department of Corrections officials will join state and local representatives tomorrow at Correctional Training Facility at Soledad to showcase the first program in the country where inmates are using an environmentally responsible alternative to dry cleaning as part of its vocational training program.

WHO: U.S EPA Regional Air Director Jack Broadbent
Superintendent of Correctional Education Yvette Page, CDC
Correctional Training Facility Warden Jim Hamlet
State Senator Richard G. Polanco (invited)
State Senator Bruce McPherson (invited)
Assemblymember Simon Salinas
Soledad Mayor Richard Ortiz

WHAT: Media Event, Site Tour

WHERE: Correctional Training Facility at Soledad

WHEN: 11:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 5

VISUALS: Following brief presentations by several officials, there will be a tour of the vocational training facility, where media can view the inmates at work on the project.

NOTE: If you plan on attending the event, contact Javier Aboytes at 831/678-5952 now for clearance.

CONTACT: Leo Kay, EPA, 415/744-2201
Terry Thornton, CDC, 916/445-4950
Javier Aboytes, CTF at Soledad, 831/678-5952

Thursday, May 17, 2001

Department of Corrections Medal of Valor Awards

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) will honor more than 75 employees for heroism and outstanding service while on duty and in the community. The men and women were selected from nominees from CDC institutions, parole regions and headquarters staff for courageous acts and for distinguishing themselves above and beyond the normal demands of correctional responsibilities.

The ceremony will be held Monday, May 21, 2001, noon, on the West Steps of the State Capitol. Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Robert Presley and CDC Director (A) Steven Cambra, Jr. will present the heroism medals and awards for the Correctional Supervisor and Correctional Officer of the Year.

During the ceremony, Sacramento news representatives Mike Boyd, KCRA-TV, Kitty O’Neal, KFBK Radio, and Doug Brauner, KMAX-TV, will highlight details of the acts that earned the medals.

Contact: Margot Bach
(916) 445-4950

Friday, March 16, 2001

MEDIA ACCESS FOR SCHEDULED EXECUTION

The execution of Robert Lee Massie, convicted of one count of first-degree murder, is set by court order for March 27, 2001, at San Quentin State Prison.

Access Inquiries:

Direct all requests and inquiries regarding access to San Quentin State Prison to the California Department of Corrections Communications Office in Sacramento, which is responsible for all media credentials. Requests are due by 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. (See "Credentials")

Reporters:

Up to 125 news media representatives may be admitted to the media center Building at San Quentin to attend news briefings and a news conference after the execution. To accommodate as many media firms as possible, each news media organization applying will be limited to one (1) representative. Firms selected to send a news reporter to witness the execution will be allowed a separate representative to the media center.

Audio/Visual/Still Photographs:

In anticipation that interest may exceed space, pool arrangements may be necessary for audio/video feeds and still photographs from inside the media center. The pool will be limited to two (2) television camera operators, two (2) still photographers, and one (1) audio engineer. The Northern California Radio Television News Directors’ Association and the Radio Television News Association in Southern California arrange the pool.

Live Broadcasts:

On-grounds parking is limited. Television and radio stations are limited to one (1) satellite or microwave vehicle.

Television Technicians:

Television technicians or microwave broadcast vehicles will be permitted three (3) support personnel (engineer, camera operator, and producer).

Radio Technicians:

Radio broadcast vehicles will be allowed two (2) support personnel (engineer and producer).

Credentials:

For media credentials, send a written request signed by the news department manager on company letterhead with the name(s) of the proposed representatives, their dates of birth, driver’s license number and expiration dates, social security numbers, and size of vehicle for live broadcast purposes to:

CDC Communications
1515 S Street, Room 113S
P.O. Box 942883
Sacramento, California 94283-0001

All written requests must be received no later than 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. Media witnesses will be selected from the requests received by that time. Telephone requests will NOT be accepted.

Security clearances are required for each individual applying for access to San Quentin. The clearance process will begin after the application deadline. No assurances can be provided that security clearances for the requests, including personnel substitutions, received after the filing period closes January 18, will be completed in time to permit access to the prison January 28, 2002.

Facilities:

The media center has 60-amp electrical service with a limited number of outlets. There are seven pay telephones. Media orders for private telephone hookups must be arranged with Pacific Bell. Pacific Bell will coordinate the actual installation with San Quentin. There is one soft drink vending machine at the media center. Media personnel should bring their own food. Only broadcast microwave and satellite vans and their support personnel providing "live feeds" will be permitted in a parking lot adjacent to the In-Service Training (IST) building.

Wednesday, February 7, 2001

MEDIA ACCESS FOR SCHEDULED EXECUTION

The execution of Robert Lee Massie, convicted of one count of first-degree murder, is set by court order for March 27, 2001, at San Quentin State Prison.

Access Inquiries:

Direct all requests and inquiries regarding access to San Quentin State Prison to the California Department of Corrections Communications Office in Sacramento, which is responsible for all media credentials. Requests are due by 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. (See "Credentials")

Reporters:

Up to 125 news media representatives may be admitted to the media center Building at San Quentin to attend news briefings and a news conference after the execution. To accommodate as many media firms as possible, each news media organization applying will be limited to one (1) representative. Firms selected to send a news reporter to witness the execution will be allowed a separate representative to the media center.

Audio/Visual/Still Photographs:

In anticipation that interest may exceed space, pool arrangements may be necessary for audio/video feeds and still photographs from inside the media center. The pool will be limited to two (2) television camera operators, two (2) still photographers, and one (1) audio engineer. The Northern California Radio Television News Directors’ Association and the Radio Television News Association in Southern California arrange the pool.

Live Broadcasts:

On-grounds parking is limited. Television and radio stations are limited to one (1) satellite or microwave vehicle.

Television Technicians:

Television technicians or microwave broadcast vehicles will be permitted three (3) support personnel (engineer, camera operator, and producer).

Radio Technicians:

Radio broadcast vehicles will be allowed two (2) support personnel (engineer and producer).

Credentials:

For media credentials, send a written request signed by the news department manager on company letterhead with the name(s) of the proposed representatives, their dates of birth, driver’s license number and expiration dates, social security numbers, and size of vehicle for live broadcast purposes to:

CDC Communications
1515 S Street, Room 113S
P.O. Box 942883
Sacramento, California 94283-0001

All written requests must be received no later than 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. Media witnesses will be selected from the requests received by that time. Telephone requests will NOT be accepted.

Security clearances are required for each individual applying for access to San Quentin. The clearance process will begin after the application deadline. No assurances can be provided that security clearances for the requests, including personnel substitutions, received after the filing period closes January 18, will be completed in time to permit access to the prison January 28, 2002.

Facilities:

The media center has 60-amp electrical service with a limited number of outlets. There are seven pay telephones. Media orders for private telephone hookups must be arranged with Pacific Bell. Pacific Bell will coordinate the actual installation with San Quentin. There is one soft drink vending machine at the media center. Media personnel should bring their own food. Only broadcast microwave and satellite vans and their support personnel providing "live feeds" will be permitted in a parking lot adjacent to the In-Service Training (IST) building.